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The mkiv Supra Owners Club

How To: Swap the PAS pump


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PAS pump, power steering pump, call it what you will - if it starts squeaking or whining, chances are you need to remove it to inspect it. I just had to do that because, as it turns out, the bearings had gone bigtime - so here is the writeup...

 

1 - Remove your main intake pipe. You might have to take your undertray off to acheive this which, I agree, a tedious job. However, it's a must - and the bonus is when all the PAS fluid comes out it won't end up in your undertray :)

You should also take your battery out - I didn't until I found I had to later.

 

Once the hose is off, your pulley will be exposed - see picture 01. Take the accessory belt off it either by levering the tensioner clockwise (manual gearbox) or using a spanner on the nut to turn the tensioner clockwise (autobox).

 

Check the pulley for any play - side to side and in & out. If there is play, your bearings are probably dead.

 

Wedge the pulley in place with a screwdriver through one of it's holes and undo the 17mm nut. The pulley should come off with a tug, no pulley remover required.

 

2 - I had the outer ring come off the pump bearing and wedge itself onto the pulley due to all the axial play in the bearings!

 

See pictures 02, 03, and 04 Note all the metal particles around the inside of the pulley wheel! The reason for this becomes apparent later.

 

Due to the amount of metal particles, I cleaned the area with an air duster at this point, and used Gunk on the pulley to clean that up. I made sure to block the throttle body up with tissue/cloth first - don't want that lot going through my cylinders...

 

The pump was covered in metal dust as well, see picture 05, and you can just about see there is something up with the bearing race.

 

3 - Get ready for fluid spillage! Take the spring clip off the top hose of the pump housing and pull the hose off the barb. see image 06 the top hose leaks most of the fluid out.

 

The bypass valve and return hose all sits on one big banjo bolt, so take that off to get all that gubbins out of the way - see image 06. Use a 24mm spanner (I used a big adjustable one) on the pump housing just above the banjo fitting, and a 22mm spanner on the banjo bolt itself. This is the point at which I had to remove the battery so that I had clearance for the big spanners.

 

4 - Once the hoses are off (and wired out of the way if they are annoying you), simply remove the two 14mm bolts at the lower front of the pump. These are long blighters but should prove no problem. The pump will now slide out upwards in true Haynes manual fashion :) See image 08

 

You can see why mine was whining and there was so much metal dust about - this bearing isn't pining for the fjords, it's dead. See Images 09 and 10!

 

5 - On another Haynes manual note, refitting is simply the reverse :D Before you put the top hose onto the pump, prime the pump with ATF/PAS fluid first.

 

6 - Fill your PAS fluid reserviour to the 'Hot' mark on the dipstick (no, not the cold one, you'll see why). Now start the engine and try to ignore the horrible screeching from the PAS pump while it bleeds the new fluid in. The noise should fade in about 20 to 30 seconds. Now turn the steering wheel slowly to full lock one way then the other. It'll screech again, but the more you do it the more the system bleeds through and the less it will complain until there isn't any noise at all. Three full lock-to-lock repetitions should be adequate, if it's still making noises, there is something amiss.

 

After this, the PAS reserviour fluid levels should have dropped to the 'Cold' mark or below. Top up again to 'Cold' this time. I used about 400ml of fluid to do all this.

 

-Ian

01 pump exposed.jpg

02 ring on pulley.jpg

03 ring and filings.jpg

04 ring off pulley.jpg

05 bearing exposed.jpg

06 ready for fluids.jpg

07 hoses off.jpg

08 pump removed.jpg

09 shagged bearings.jpg

10 shagged bearings 2.jpg

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6 - Fill your PAS fluid reserviour to the 'Hot' mark on the dipstick (no, not the cold one, you'll see why). Now start the engine and try to ignore the horrible screeching from the PAS pump while it bleeds the new fluid in. The noise should fade in about 20 to 30 seconds. Now turn the steering wheel slowly to full lock one way then the other. It'll screech again, but the more you do it the more the system bleeds through and the less it will complain until there isn't any noise at all. Three full lock-to-lock repetitions should be adequate, if it's still making noises, there is something amiss.

 

According to the Toyota manual - this bit is done witht the front on jacks/stands.

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Great write up, Ian.

Can I add one comment? After the initial filling of the fluid and the turning of the steering from lock to lock a few times the fluid may well be full of air bubbles. At this point I've found it's best to turn the engine off and let the bubbles disperse naturally for 10 mins or so. Once the system has settled, and the air has presumably accumulated into pockets throughout the PAS system, restart the engine and repeat the lock to lock procedure one more time and your system will be nicely air free and quiet.

Did you mention that it's best to do the lock to lock thing with the wheels off the ground?

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Thats an excellent write up, i think i will be using it very soon.

I dont want to hijack your thread but i have attached a pic of the exploded EPC diagram, i think that would be good to add to the faq so people can see what parts they might need to buy before they embark on the job.

 

p.s i got a price for the pump from toyota and it was

 

44320-14250 - vane pump - £389.21 + vat

power steering pump.jpg

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Great write up, Ian.

Can I add one comment? After the initial filling of the fluid and the turning of the steering from lock to lock a few times the fluid may well be full of air bubbles. At this point I've found it's best to turn the engine off and let the bubbles disperse naturally for 10 mins or so. Once the system has settled, and the air has presumably accumulated into pockets throughout the PAS system, restart the engine and repeat the lock to lock procedure one more time and your system will be nicely air free and quiet.

Did you mention that it's best to do the lock to lock thing with the wheels off the ground?

 

Thanks for that Jake. Yep, mine was full of bubbles too, I then left the car overnight and it's been fine today, blatting round Norwich in the heat buying comics to read hahaha.

 

Yep, as Heckler said, front wheels should be off the ground to avoid stressing the pump, especially when it's got no fluid. Mine weren't off the ground (I forgot) but were on cardboard on dusty garage floor, and that eased the strain on the pump :innocent:

 

-Ian

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