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How To: Replace a rear wheel stud


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Or five :) After a funny creaking noise turned into a cracked stud that I was lucky to find early, I thought (what with 600bhp being on tap these days) I would swap all my rear wheel studs. No sense messing about especially as the studs are under £2 each.

 

I'm assuming you can get your rear hub to look like pic 1.

 

The hardest bit is taking the old studs out, as this can involve some clobbering which is really bad for your expensive wheel bearing. In order to avoid this clobbering I got myself a cheapo ball joint remover of a specific design from Halfords... (pic 2).

 

Locate the tool as shown in pic 3. If it's the same tool as I got it will fit although it's close :) It also has to go in at this exact point, it won't fit any other way. Smaller ball joint tools may. The two prongs go either side of the back of the wheel stud, the single prong as square on the nose of the stud as possible. Tighten it up so that it's got a good grip, but before the prong starts to work it's way off the stud nose (pic 4)

 

Now that all the tension is taken up, we can shock the stud out a bit. Using a hammer (pic 5), tap the tip of the prong. It doesn't have to be, and indeed shouldn't be, a big hit - wrist action only ;) You'll find the stud moves quite effectively - it may go so far as to make the BJ seperator lose it's grip and fall off.

 

Once the stud is loose, winkle it out via the route shown in pics 6, 7, 8, and 9. Get a new shiny stud in the same way (pic 10) and locate it in the hole.

 

To relocate the wheel stud firmly and fully, refit your brake disc and get a wheel nut (a spare one would be ideal but you can use your regular one). Wind on the wheel nut (pic 11) and just before it's flush with the brake disc, squirt on a bit of WD40 to lubricate the surface. Try not to get any on the disc's friction area though ;) (pic 12).

 

Now just lock up the hub. I didn't use the handbrake as the disc wasn't really on properly, instead I used a jack handle to wedge it for doing up (pic 13) and undoing (pic 14) the nut again.

 

You should now have wound in the stud to the point in pic 15. Now do the other four :D

 

-Ian

01_hub_exposed.jpg

02_balljoint_tool.jpg

03_locating_tool.jpg

04_tightening_tool.jpg

05_shocking_stud.jpg

06_stud_loose.jpg

07_stud_extraction1.jpg

08_stud_extraction2.jpg

09_stud_extraction3.jpg

10_new_stud.jpg

11_pulling_in_new_stud.jpg

12_oiling_surface.jpg

13_forcing_in_stud.jpg

14_backing_off_nut.jpg

15_seated_stud.jpg

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The hardest bit is taking the old studs out, as this can involve some clobbering which is really bad for your expensive wheel bearing. In order to avoid this clobbering I got myself a cheapo ball joint remover of a specific design from Halfords...-Ian

Do I get the credit for this idea? :smartass: :)

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I think you do :) I remembered you using a BJ seperator to wind the studs out but I found that didn't work for me, the stud nose kept deforming and the tool would slip off - so instead I used it to take up all the slack and just twatted it ;)

 

-Ian

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  • 11 months later...
  • 2 years later...
Can I ask where the wheel stud tool can be purchased? Is there another name for it? :)

 

I bought mine from halfords, normal ball joint separator for £15. I had to turn some washers out for it though as there was quite a bit of left/right play about the pin which was causing it to slip off the stud.

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  • 3 years later...
Guest Budz86

Old skool thread revival!

 

Would the same process be used for changing a front wheel stud? And am I right in thinking by reading the above that the wheel stud isn't screwed in and can just simply be removed by an encouraging 'whack'? Surprises me a bit that it's not bolted into something...

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Old skool thread revival!

 

Would the same process be used for changing a front wheel stud? And am I right in thinking by reading the above that the wheel stud isn't screwed in and can just simply be removed by an encouraging 'whack'? Surprises me a bit that it's not bolted into something...

 

Correct, although whacking is not the best option, gently is better or use a pusher, I managed to do mine using various hub pullers etc.

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  • 1 year later...

Yes mate just undo the bolts holding the carryer and pop disc off take a look in first post at pics

It can be done with brake shoes still fitted just take time to guide the studs past the springs in and out make it easyier for your self so you don't push a stud out then you get it stuck

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